Japanese and Korean learning log – March 2018

18 March, 2018

Hello everybody! 🙂 It’s been a long while on the blog but I’m glad I managed to have a quiet and productive afternoon to myself and the languages. I often get asked how I manage to find time for language study all these years, as I transit from being a student to a working adult. It’s difficult, and most of the time I’m also struggling to find that balance between what I need to do and my hobbies. In the end, it boils down to priorities and to me, language study is a form of enjoyment and therapy and hence I take the effort to squeeze time out for it.

I don’t know if it sounds strange, but I’m most at ease when immersed in the world of languages :).

Korean

New books give me motivation and hence I’m always adding to my collection of unfinished books 😛 I try to read as widely as possible in Korean and hence I tend to buy the most random books in Korean. (Such as books on FinTech and law). The most recent addition to the collection is a textbook on Theories on Public Administration 😛 I just love the idea of challenging myself to difficult texts and recently, I’m quite into academic texts hahaha. I don’t speak Korean at all in my daily life, so I’m trying to maintain language proficiency by reading as and when I can. It’s difficult to set goals in the advanced level and sometimes I feel a little lost (and unmotivated) when progress is less obvious (compared to the beginner and intermediate level). That said, I’m working on a few things right now: (i) to highlight fewer words in texts; and (ii) to improve reading stamina and concentration.

Japanese

I barely did anything for Japanese in the past year and I’m suffering the consequences ><. I can clearly feel that my Japanese reading ability has been negatively impacted so I’m working slowly and steadily to build it up again. I bought a couple of new books (motivation :P), which I’ll share again in a separate post. But I’m sooo happy that today, I managed to sit down and really learn a couple of grammar points. Can’t remember the last time I concentrated so well in a long while.

Sharing my staple grammar books for now!

  • Kanzen Master (Grammar) N2 – Love this series!!
  • Japanese Grammar Dictionary – Got the Korean version instead! I believe they have it in several languages
  • Handbook on Japanese Grammar – It’s actually a book for people teaching Japanese to intermediate/advanced learners

The last book is a new (sort of) addition to the collection. I really like it as it goes into the nuances of the grammar point and how it differs from other similar grammar structures. While the one in the middle works more like a dictionary, with more sample sentences. Will blog about these two books next time! (Remind me)

It’s a good language-learning day :’)

6 Comments
    1. I usually don’t buy language books but might purchase some in the future if I’m pursuing a lesser known language. Or perhaps a workbook for Korean.

      I hope you enjoy your language books.

    1. I know what you mean about having to buy textbooks even though you haven’t finished others yet. I miss learning Korean so much that I ordered two new textbooks, even though I can’t read and write more than a few sentences at a time even in English, due to my illness (it took me 3 tries to read this blog post).

      I guess that way in a case of miracle cure I’ll be ready to start studying right away 🙂

    1. glad you bought a korean textbook that’s for native korean speakers on a topic instead of a textbook for korean learners. though i cannot comprehend why you’d want to read a textbook?? i like reading stuff for fun lol but i guess you find that fun. update us on the book if you finish it.

      i thought since you already learned korean to a high level you’d try to tackle japanese in a more efficient way than copying grammar textbooks…. at least i tried to be more efficient in learning korean after learning japanese to a higher level.

      1. Perhaps that wasn’t your intention, but your comment sounds very critical, and in a negative way. You’re probably just sharing your thoughts, but it’s not easy to be so open about one’s learning progress like Shanna is, so maybe try to keep that in mind next time you decide how to phrase your comment.

    1. I think for Korean you shouldn’t worry about goals. people usually get fluent because they enjoy doing whatever it is they do in the language not because they’re doing stuff for the sake of becoming of fluent. you should do whatever it is that you enjoy and continue looking words/grammar up…

      1. the generic goal you could apply to korean is to learn more words. if you don’t understand a korean drama without subtitles it’s either because you don’t know the word or you can’t what they’re saying aka your listening comprehension. it’d kinda funny how your blog is titled hangukdrama but you’re not obsessed and addicted to kdramas lol. maybe you were at one point

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